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Are you a survivor?

Do you think you might be facing domestic violence? You don’t have to be a victim any longer.

How do I know if I am facing domestic violence?
  • If the partner hits, punches, slaps, chokes or shoves you
  • If the partner destroys personal property
  • If the partner prevents you from seeing friends and family
  • If the partner insults you in public and/or in private
  • If the partner controls your finances
  • If the partner shows extreme jealousy or accuses you of infidelity
  • If the partner forces you to have sex against your will
  • If the partner harasses you for dowry
2. Who faces domestic violence?

Anyone may be a survivor of domestic violence:

  • Domestic violence does not only occur in lower socio-economic groups or illiterate households.
  • Domestic violence does not only occur only among married couples.
  • Domestic violence does not only occur in certain religious groups.
  • Domestic violence does not only occur in certain ethnic groups.
3. What should I do if I am suffering from domestic violence?
Do’s
  • Seek out support. You don’t have to suffer alone. Inform people close to you (family, friends, and neighbors) about your situation so they are prepared to react to suspected violence.
  • Try to start an individual savings account as an economic safety net. Have statements sent to a trusted relative or friend.
  • Put together an emergency bag with keys, money, medicine and important papers such as birth certificates, education certificates, ration card/election card, passports (yours and your children’s), bank details, personal identification, health records, and insurance papers.
  • Talk to your children about what they should do if a violent incident occurs. Teach children the address of your house, relevant emergency phone numbers, and the name of their grandparents in case of an emergency.
  • Plan an emergency exit route from home and work, and learn safe places to go for help and support in case of emergency.
  • Take photographs or keep medical records of your scars and keep them in a safe hiding place; show them to friends/doctors.
  • Talk to your children about what they should do if a violent incident occurs. Teach children the address of your house, relevant emergency phone numbers, and the name of their grandparents in case of an emergency.
  • Call for police, medical attention, get legal help and counseling for yourself and your children.
  • Use good judgment of relationship structure in the household and/or the community you live in before confiding in your in-laws or his friends for help.
Don’ts
  • Directly confront the partner/spouse.
  • Put your health and security secondary to your family’s. Even if he has promised to change, make sure a legal professional and/or a social worker has a record of the incident.
  • Bring pamphlets home
  • Use your husband or partner’s cell phone to call helplines
  • Use your home computer for browsing domestic violence resources.
  • If using a home computer, clear history and cache when visiting DV related websites and pages. Here is how
5. I am ready to get help. What do I do now?
  • Call your nearest service provider or national helpline. These helplines are run by professional counselors and trainers who are adept in handing these issues and your identity will remain anonymous.
  • File a complaint using a DIR form available with NGO service providers, protection officers and women’s police stations in your area. (Please remember, this a civil law and not a criminal law)
  • Try to also speak to your family and tell them that it’s only a law that shall provide the women facing violence a safe space.
  • If unable to receive help from your family, try and speak to your friends about your situation.